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8 Countries You Didn't Know Have Amazing Beaches (Slideshow)

8 Countries You Didn't Know Have Amazing Beaches (Slideshow)


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Skip the usual suspects on your next beach getaway, and instead discover the sands of one of these unexpected countries

Shutterstock/ muratart

China

Shutterstock/ Efired

Shot in the dark, but I’m going to wager that most people don’t think of the word “beach” when they hear “China.” But land-wise China is a huge country, and it contains enormous cities, tons of mountains, and endless stretches of rural areas, along with quite a large coastline on the eastern and southern sides. It’s true that Chinese folks aren’t the biggest beach-goers in the world (although with such a large population, generalizations are tricky), but don’t let that deter you. In fact, it means you’ll like have more space to yourself, especially during the hottest part of the day. While Beidaihe in the north is known for its long stretches of sand and shallow water, and Putuoshan Island is worth a trip if you’re in the Shanghai area, the south is really where it’s at. Head to the large island of Sanya and whether you end up at Yalong Bay (the most popular), Sanya Bay (the least crowded), Wuzhizhou (“The Maldives of China;” great for diving), or Tianya Haijiao (the second-most southern point), you’ll be pleasantly surprised at the beautiful sand, surf, and sun.

Germany

Northern European country, chilly weather, and only a small portion of its border is coastline — we get it, Germany isn’t an obvious beach country. But with average temperatures in the summer around 72 degrees F (and up into the 80s and even 90s at times), there’s plenty of time to book it to the beach. Sylt, Germany’s northernmost island, has almost 25 miles of fine, sandy beaches, and seeing the sunset from Rotes Kliff (red cliff) near Kampen is highly recommended. Germany actually has a surprising number of islands, with Usedom (which shares it’s 28 miles of coastline with Poland), Amrum (your best chance to have a beach to yourself), Rugen (the largest, with 38 miles of beach, a few seaside resorts, and an average of 1800 hours of sun each year), and Hiddensee and Juist (both totally car-free) rounding out the list. Want to avoid a spell of rock fever? Head to the mainland’s Bay of Lübeck, which has numerous lighthouses dotting its four beaches.

Iceland

Thinkstock

Don’t let the country’s frigid name fool you, Iceland has some ridiculous beaches — it is an island, after all. The temperatures can get quite cold for most of the year, but in the peak of summer, it’s not unusual to see temperature highs land in the low 70s or even low 80s. A two-hour drive from the capital, Reykjavik, is the southern town of Vik and its breathtaking beaches. Reynisfjara Beach has black sand and pebbles, and the nearby basalt caves are more than worthy of a visit. On the flip side, Budir Beach on the Snaefellsnes peninsula in the west is one of the rare light-colored beaches in Iceland. The tip of this peninsula is also home to the Snæfellsjökull volcano, one of the main symbols of the country. Eager to take a dip but worried about the water temp? Nautholsvik (near Reykjavik) is a thermal beach heated by hot water flowing into the bay.

India

Shutterstock/ Lucky-photographer

The Taj Mahal is breathtaking and the bustling, the skyscraping metropolis of Mumbai is astounding, but what about all that coastline? People don’t often consider it, but there are many beautiful beaches of all types in India. Baga Beach is by far the most happening and touristy option, but the open sands of its northern Goa neighbors Ashvem, Mandrem, and Morjim (all in a row) are getting trendier each year. Hoping for serenity now? Agonda Beach (south Goa) should be your destination, or the even more remote Radhanagar Beach on Havelock Island in the Andaman and Nicobar Islands — once named Asia’s best beach by TIME Magazine. For the best views, head down to Palolem Beach, unless you’re looking for the best underwater views; in that case, bring your snorkel and scuba gear to southern Maharashtra’s Tarkarli Beach, which features one of the best coral reefs in India.

Montenegro

Most people know that Croatia and Greece have unbelievably beautiful beaches, but very few people consider the land in between. Just south of Dubrovnik is the border between Croatia and the small country of Montenegro — which should get some attention for its lovely coastline as well. With summer temperatures soaring into the 90s, you’ll want to head for the ocean, so here are a few places to keep in mind. Budva is the most popular destination (for both its beaches and historic buildings), but keep heading south and you’ll reach Miločer Beach, Queen’s Beach, and the islet of Sveti Stefan, known for its pink sand beach. Formerly a small village, all of the islet’s buildings were acquired by the Yugoslav government in the mid-2000s and turned into an upscale hotel.

Scotland

Shutterstock/ Antony Cooper

It doesn’t get too warm too often in Scotland, but when the heat happens to hit on a summer day, head to the Isle of Barra. The westernmost island in the U.K. offers several beautiful, white sand beaches, with many of them often completely deserted. Our top pick for specific beaches is definitely Traigh Mhor; if there’s a breeze (which there often is), you can watch the surfers and windsurfers ride by, and this is also the same beach where planes land twice daily. No, it’s not part of some tour — the sand runway is actually part of the local airport. There are three runways altogether, and at high tide all three are underwater.

Sweden

Shutterstock/ Henrik Larsson

Since the weather Sweden is generally thought of as cold and often dark, most tourists don’t consider it as a beach destination — which is quite unfortunate. In the winter, this description can be accurate — especially up north — but it’s important to remember that from top to bottom, Sweden stretches almost 1,000 miles. And as we recently learned from chatting with five random Swedes, when the weather gets warm in the south (Gothenburg temperatures can hit 70 in the summer; Malmö can reach 80), the people head outdoors including trips to one of Sweden’s sweet beaches. You can spend your day at Ribersborg (or “Ribban,” as the locals call it) before checking out the wonderful restaurants of Malmö, ferry out to Fårö off the coast of Gotland (an island off an island) for both family fun and a chance to check out unspoiled sands, or even trek to Tanto Beach if you find yourself in Stockholm on a sizzling summer day.

Turkey

Shutterstock/ muratart

More than half of Turkey’s border is coastline, but unfortunately, not much is beach. Still, there are some fantastic beaches, including one of the most photographed in the entire Mediterranean. Ölüdeniz (literally “Dead Sea,” due to the exceptionally calm waters) is a small village and resort area with a big, beautiful beach. The region is called the Turquoise Coast, and for good reason — head to the blue lagoon at the mouth of Ölüdeniz’s sandy bay to see for yourself. Don’t worry if you’ve never heard of this place, the beach’s legitimacy and high status can be confirmed considering its Blue Flag certification for passing water, safety, and environmental education and management standards.


10 Countries Where It’s NBD to Show Up Late to Everything

One of the best things about traveling the world is getting to learn all about different customs and cultures. From food and social practices to local art, there’s an endless amount to discover about the amazing countries you visit. Part of having those experiences is trial and error, especially when it comes to timing. Whether people arrive on time, a little late or extremely late varies widely from country to country. As a traveler, not knowing when to show up for things can cause problems like missed trains or being super rude, so we decided to poll a travel-savvy group of ladies to find out exactly what clock different countries are on. This is by no means an exhaustive list, but if you happen to be traveling to any of these places, you’ll probably appreciate the heads-up!

COUNTRIES Where it’s 100 PERCENT okay to be Late

1. Greece: “When I studied abroad in Greece, I was warned that the ferry schedules were more of a guideline than something to plan a trip around. Apparently, multi-hour delays were not unheard of. But then again, the easygoing way of life there was part of what I loved about the culture, and there was always someone willing to talk to you while waiting.” — Auburn

2. Nepal: “‘Nepali time’ is just a synonym for being late.” — Elen

3. Spain: “It took me awhile to get used to the fact that I could show up for appointments late when I lived in Spain. I finally learned after about five hair, nail and doctor appointments that if you arrive on time, you’re going to wait at least a half hour anyway. So you might as well just show up 15 to 30 minutes after your scheduled time slot. The same goes for going out to dinner or meeting friends for drinks, except I’d say you should show up at least an hour later than the agreed upon time.” — Rachel

4. Ecuador: “When I was living in Ecuador, the government had to make a rule that you had to be at meetings within some absurd time of when it started (it was like an hour) because they were losing so much productivity from people showing up late. I’ve never been a minute late for anything in my life, so it was quite an adjustment for me.” — Naomi

5. The Republic of Georgia: “I thought I had a tendency to be late… nothing like the Georgians! I lived there off and on in my late 20s. Time itself is basically inconsistent there. ‘Georgia time’ means hours late, but it’s actually on time for them. Buses leave whenever they feel they’re ready to depart. It was surprisingly frustrating at first, but it was a great way to live in the present!” — Crystal

6. Cuba: “My husband is from Havana, and I’ve spent a lot of time there in the last 15 years. During my first trip there, the bus driver stopped to buy fruit and chatted up people at bus stations. The four-hour trip took six. And if anyone says they’ll be ‘right over,’ expect them to take another two hours — minimum.” — Melanie

7. South Africa: “People are always (charmingly) late in Cape Town. It’s a culture of lateness, so much so that there are three different terms for ‘now,’ and not one of them means ‘now’ as we understand it. There is NOW, which means eventually (maybe!) then JUST NOW, which means later and finally NOW NOW, which means soonish. I’m not even sure if there’s actually a term for now, as in this second!” — Sandra

8. The Philippines: “In the Philippines, everyone’s late all the time, especially in the cities. You just can’t predict how long you’ll have to sit in traffic. We could go pick up my cousins at school at 3pm and get home at 4pm, or at 6pm.” — Adrienne

9. Morocco: “There’s no time given for appointments. Usually they are ‘morning’ or ‘afternoon.’ For meetings, it’s something like ‘after Asr prayer,’ meaning sometime after the afternoon prayer (in the Muslim faith) but before the night prayer time.” — Amanda

10. France: “It’s an in-between country. In Paris, when you’re invited to dinner, it’s actually kind of rude to arrive on time — the hostess is probably still in the shower. You’re supposed to be about 15 minutes late, but more than half an hour late is rude. After living in Paris so long, my time sense is French and I find other countries stressful. The French are relatively punctual, but you usually have 15 minutes leeway. Very sensible.” — Julie

You’re going to want to be On Time or Early here

1. Switzerland: “You’ll get a train route with two-minute connections and it all works out just fine. If your train is three minutes late, they’re profusely apologetic.” — Kat

“I was on a tour in Switzerland once where the guide was so time-focused that he kept saying things like ‘We have to go we’ve been here seven minutes already!’ and ‘Hurry up, lunch is waiting!’ Later on, our group was at dinner with a different host and decided to go to a pub afterward. When we asked the host how long it would take to walk there, she said, ‘Eleven-and-a-half minutes.’ Not ’10-15 minutes’ as I would have said, but eleven-and-a-half. That’s how specific the Swiss get about time.” — Annika

2. The Netherlands: “In the Netherlands, you always arrive on time and sometimes even early.” — Olga

3. Japan: “I lived in Japan, and a rule of thumb is that if you arrive five minutes early for anything (a meeting, social engagement, to catch a bus, etc.), you’re on time. If you arrive on time, you’re late. I learned this the hard way by arriving one minute late (I kid you not) for a work event that required a mini-van to transport us to a venue. My one-minute tardiness resulted in the van leaving without me, as it left AT the set meeting time. Also, trains depart literally to the minute (e.g. 10:23am), so if you get to the train station at 10:22am, you have a minute to get on that train, because it starts moving at 10:23.” — Ang

4. Germany: “We were meeting a real estate agent in Munich, and were five minutes late. The agent had left in anger by the time we arrived. And when a German friend came to visit us in NYC, he was mortified because he was three minutes late to dinner.” — Julie

5. South Korea: “I spent a month in Seoul, where restaurants stop accepting customers an hour before they close, things often close early and the trains (. ) run *early* from time to time. I met my friend’s Korean parents, and they were 30 minutes early. I had no idea how to deal.” — Najva

Have you traveled anywhere where the time customs surprised you? Tell us about your experiences @BritandCo!


10 Countries Where It’s NBD to Show Up Late to Everything

One of the best things about traveling the world is getting to learn all about different customs and cultures. From food and social practices to local art, there’s an endless amount to discover about the amazing countries you visit. Part of having those experiences is trial and error, especially when it comes to timing. Whether people arrive on time, a little late or extremely late varies widely from country to country. As a traveler, not knowing when to show up for things can cause problems like missed trains or being super rude, so we decided to poll a travel-savvy group of ladies to find out exactly what clock different countries are on. This is by no means an exhaustive list, but if you happen to be traveling to any of these places, you’ll probably appreciate the heads-up!

COUNTRIES Where it’s 100 PERCENT okay to be Late

1. Greece: “When I studied abroad in Greece, I was warned that the ferry schedules were more of a guideline than something to plan a trip around. Apparently, multi-hour delays were not unheard of. But then again, the easygoing way of life there was part of what I loved about the culture, and there was always someone willing to talk to you while waiting.” — Auburn

2. Nepal: “‘Nepali time’ is just a synonym for being late.” — Elen

3. Spain: “It took me awhile to get used to the fact that I could show up for appointments late when I lived in Spain. I finally learned after about five hair, nail and doctor appointments that if you arrive on time, you’re going to wait at least a half hour anyway. So you might as well just show up 15 to 30 minutes after your scheduled time slot. The same goes for going out to dinner or meeting friends for drinks, except I’d say you should show up at least an hour later than the agreed upon time.” — Rachel

4. Ecuador: “When I was living in Ecuador, the government had to make a rule that you had to be at meetings within some absurd time of when it started (it was like an hour) because they were losing so much productivity from people showing up late. I’ve never been a minute late for anything in my life, so it was quite an adjustment for me.” — Naomi

5. The Republic of Georgia: “I thought I had a tendency to be late… nothing like the Georgians! I lived there off and on in my late 20s. Time itself is basically inconsistent there. ‘Georgia time’ means hours late, but it’s actually on time for them. Buses leave whenever they feel they’re ready to depart. It was surprisingly frustrating at first, but it was a great way to live in the present!” — Crystal

6. Cuba: “My husband is from Havana, and I’ve spent a lot of time there in the last 15 years. During my first trip there, the bus driver stopped to buy fruit and chatted up people at bus stations. The four-hour trip took six. And if anyone says they’ll be ‘right over,’ expect them to take another two hours — minimum.” — Melanie

7. South Africa: “People are always (charmingly) late in Cape Town. It’s a culture of lateness, so much so that there are three different terms for ‘now,’ and not one of them means ‘now’ as we understand it. There is NOW, which means eventually (maybe!) then JUST NOW, which means later and finally NOW NOW, which means soonish. I’m not even sure if there’s actually a term for now, as in this second!” — Sandra

8. The Philippines: “In the Philippines, everyone’s late all the time, especially in the cities. You just can’t predict how long you’ll have to sit in traffic. We could go pick up my cousins at school at 3pm and get home at 4pm, or at 6pm.” — Adrienne

9. Morocco: “There’s no time given for appointments. Usually they are ‘morning’ or ‘afternoon.’ For meetings, it’s something like ‘after Asr prayer,’ meaning sometime after the afternoon prayer (in the Muslim faith) but before the night prayer time.” — Amanda

10. France: “It’s an in-between country. In Paris, when you’re invited to dinner, it’s actually kind of rude to arrive on time — the hostess is probably still in the shower. You’re supposed to be about 15 minutes late, but more than half an hour late is rude. After living in Paris so long, my time sense is French and I find other countries stressful. The French are relatively punctual, but you usually have 15 minutes leeway. Very sensible.” — Julie

You’re going to want to be On Time or Early here

1. Switzerland: “You’ll get a train route with two-minute connections and it all works out just fine. If your train is three minutes late, they’re profusely apologetic.” — Kat

“I was on a tour in Switzerland once where the guide was so time-focused that he kept saying things like ‘We have to go we’ve been here seven minutes already!’ and ‘Hurry up, lunch is waiting!’ Later on, our group was at dinner with a different host and decided to go to a pub afterward. When we asked the host how long it would take to walk there, she said, ‘Eleven-and-a-half minutes.’ Not ’10-15 minutes’ as I would have said, but eleven-and-a-half. That’s how specific the Swiss get about time.” — Annika

2. The Netherlands: “In the Netherlands, you always arrive on time and sometimes even early.” — Olga

3. Japan: “I lived in Japan, and a rule of thumb is that if you arrive five minutes early for anything (a meeting, social engagement, to catch a bus, etc.), you’re on time. If you arrive on time, you’re late. I learned this the hard way by arriving one minute late (I kid you not) for a work event that required a mini-van to transport us to a venue. My one-minute tardiness resulted in the van leaving without me, as it left AT the set meeting time. Also, trains depart literally to the minute (e.g. 10:23am), so if you get to the train station at 10:22am, you have a minute to get on that train, because it starts moving at 10:23.” — Ang

4. Germany: “We were meeting a real estate agent in Munich, and were five minutes late. The agent had left in anger by the time we arrived. And when a German friend came to visit us in NYC, he was mortified because he was three minutes late to dinner.” — Julie

5. South Korea: “I spent a month in Seoul, where restaurants stop accepting customers an hour before they close, things often close early and the trains (. ) run *early* from time to time. I met my friend’s Korean parents, and they were 30 minutes early. I had no idea how to deal.” — Najva

Have you traveled anywhere where the time customs surprised you? Tell us about your experiences @BritandCo!


10 Countries Where It’s NBD to Show Up Late to Everything

One of the best things about traveling the world is getting to learn all about different customs and cultures. From food and social practices to local art, there’s an endless amount to discover about the amazing countries you visit. Part of having those experiences is trial and error, especially when it comes to timing. Whether people arrive on time, a little late or extremely late varies widely from country to country. As a traveler, not knowing when to show up for things can cause problems like missed trains or being super rude, so we decided to poll a travel-savvy group of ladies to find out exactly what clock different countries are on. This is by no means an exhaustive list, but if you happen to be traveling to any of these places, you’ll probably appreciate the heads-up!

COUNTRIES Where it’s 100 PERCENT okay to be Late

1. Greece: “When I studied abroad in Greece, I was warned that the ferry schedules were more of a guideline than something to plan a trip around. Apparently, multi-hour delays were not unheard of. But then again, the easygoing way of life there was part of what I loved about the culture, and there was always someone willing to talk to you while waiting.” — Auburn

2. Nepal: “‘Nepali time’ is just a synonym for being late.” — Elen

3. Spain: “It took me awhile to get used to the fact that I could show up for appointments late when I lived in Spain. I finally learned after about five hair, nail and doctor appointments that if you arrive on time, you’re going to wait at least a half hour anyway. So you might as well just show up 15 to 30 minutes after your scheduled time slot. The same goes for going out to dinner or meeting friends for drinks, except I’d say you should show up at least an hour later than the agreed upon time.” — Rachel

4. Ecuador: “When I was living in Ecuador, the government had to make a rule that you had to be at meetings within some absurd time of when it started (it was like an hour) because they were losing so much productivity from people showing up late. I’ve never been a minute late for anything in my life, so it was quite an adjustment for me.” — Naomi

5. The Republic of Georgia: “I thought I had a tendency to be late… nothing like the Georgians! I lived there off and on in my late 20s. Time itself is basically inconsistent there. ‘Georgia time’ means hours late, but it’s actually on time for them. Buses leave whenever they feel they’re ready to depart. It was surprisingly frustrating at first, but it was a great way to live in the present!” — Crystal

6. Cuba: “My husband is from Havana, and I’ve spent a lot of time there in the last 15 years. During my first trip there, the bus driver stopped to buy fruit and chatted up people at bus stations. The four-hour trip took six. And if anyone says they’ll be ‘right over,’ expect them to take another two hours — minimum.” — Melanie

7. South Africa: “People are always (charmingly) late in Cape Town. It’s a culture of lateness, so much so that there are three different terms for ‘now,’ and not one of them means ‘now’ as we understand it. There is NOW, which means eventually (maybe!) then JUST NOW, which means later and finally NOW NOW, which means soonish. I’m not even sure if there’s actually a term for now, as in this second!” — Sandra

8. The Philippines: “In the Philippines, everyone’s late all the time, especially in the cities. You just can’t predict how long you’ll have to sit in traffic. We could go pick up my cousins at school at 3pm and get home at 4pm, or at 6pm.” — Adrienne

9. Morocco: “There’s no time given for appointments. Usually they are ‘morning’ or ‘afternoon.’ For meetings, it’s something like ‘after Asr prayer,’ meaning sometime after the afternoon prayer (in the Muslim faith) but before the night prayer time.” — Amanda

10. France: “It’s an in-between country. In Paris, when you’re invited to dinner, it’s actually kind of rude to arrive on time — the hostess is probably still in the shower. You’re supposed to be about 15 minutes late, but more than half an hour late is rude. After living in Paris so long, my time sense is French and I find other countries stressful. The French are relatively punctual, but you usually have 15 minutes leeway. Very sensible.” — Julie

You’re going to want to be On Time or Early here

1. Switzerland: “You’ll get a train route with two-minute connections and it all works out just fine. If your train is three minutes late, they’re profusely apologetic.” — Kat

“I was on a tour in Switzerland once where the guide was so time-focused that he kept saying things like ‘We have to go we’ve been here seven minutes already!’ and ‘Hurry up, lunch is waiting!’ Later on, our group was at dinner with a different host and decided to go to a pub afterward. When we asked the host how long it would take to walk there, she said, ‘Eleven-and-a-half minutes.’ Not ’10-15 minutes’ as I would have said, but eleven-and-a-half. That’s how specific the Swiss get about time.” — Annika

2. The Netherlands: “In the Netherlands, you always arrive on time and sometimes even early.” — Olga

3. Japan: “I lived in Japan, and a rule of thumb is that if you arrive five minutes early for anything (a meeting, social engagement, to catch a bus, etc.), you’re on time. If you arrive on time, you’re late. I learned this the hard way by arriving one minute late (I kid you not) for a work event that required a mini-van to transport us to a venue. My one-minute tardiness resulted in the van leaving without me, as it left AT the set meeting time. Also, trains depart literally to the minute (e.g. 10:23am), so if you get to the train station at 10:22am, you have a minute to get on that train, because it starts moving at 10:23.” — Ang

4. Germany: “We were meeting a real estate agent in Munich, and were five minutes late. The agent had left in anger by the time we arrived. And when a German friend came to visit us in NYC, he was mortified because he was three minutes late to dinner.” — Julie

5. South Korea: “I spent a month in Seoul, where restaurants stop accepting customers an hour before they close, things often close early and the trains (. ) run *early* from time to time. I met my friend’s Korean parents, and they were 30 minutes early. I had no idea how to deal.” — Najva

Have you traveled anywhere where the time customs surprised you? Tell us about your experiences @BritandCo!


10 Countries Where It’s NBD to Show Up Late to Everything

One of the best things about traveling the world is getting to learn all about different customs and cultures. From food and social practices to local art, there’s an endless amount to discover about the amazing countries you visit. Part of having those experiences is trial and error, especially when it comes to timing. Whether people arrive on time, a little late or extremely late varies widely from country to country. As a traveler, not knowing when to show up for things can cause problems like missed trains or being super rude, so we decided to poll a travel-savvy group of ladies to find out exactly what clock different countries are on. This is by no means an exhaustive list, but if you happen to be traveling to any of these places, you’ll probably appreciate the heads-up!

COUNTRIES Where it’s 100 PERCENT okay to be Late

1. Greece: “When I studied abroad in Greece, I was warned that the ferry schedules were more of a guideline than something to plan a trip around. Apparently, multi-hour delays were not unheard of. But then again, the easygoing way of life there was part of what I loved about the culture, and there was always someone willing to talk to you while waiting.” — Auburn

2. Nepal: “‘Nepali time’ is just a synonym for being late.” — Elen

3. Spain: “It took me awhile to get used to the fact that I could show up for appointments late when I lived in Spain. I finally learned after about five hair, nail and doctor appointments that if you arrive on time, you’re going to wait at least a half hour anyway. So you might as well just show up 15 to 30 minutes after your scheduled time slot. The same goes for going out to dinner or meeting friends for drinks, except I’d say you should show up at least an hour later than the agreed upon time.” — Rachel

4. Ecuador: “When I was living in Ecuador, the government had to make a rule that you had to be at meetings within some absurd time of when it started (it was like an hour) because they were losing so much productivity from people showing up late. I’ve never been a minute late for anything in my life, so it was quite an adjustment for me.” — Naomi

5. The Republic of Georgia: “I thought I had a tendency to be late… nothing like the Georgians! I lived there off and on in my late 20s. Time itself is basically inconsistent there. ‘Georgia time’ means hours late, but it’s actually on time for them. Buses leave whenever they feel they’re ready to depart. It was surprisingly frustrating at first, but it was a great way to live in the present!” — Crystal

6. Cuba: “My husband is from Havana, and I’ve spent a lot of time there in the last 15 years. During my first trip there, the bus driver stopped to buy fruit and chatted up people at bus stations. The four-hour trip took six. And if anyone says they’ll be ‘right over,’ expect them to take another two hours — minimum.” — Melanie

7. South Africa: “People are always (charmingly) late in Cape Town. It’s a culture of lateness, so much so that there are three different terms for ‘now,’ and not one of them means ‘now’ as we understand it. There is NOW, which means eventually (maybe!) then JUST NOW, which means later and finally NOW NOW, which means soonish. I’m not even sure if there’s actually a term for now, as in this second!” — Sandra

8. The Philippines: “In the Philippines, everyone’s late all the time, especially in the cities. You just can’t predict how long you’ll have to sit in traffic. We could go pick up my cousins at school at 3pm and get home at 4pm, or at 6pm.” — Adrienne

9. Morocco: “There’s no time given for appointments. Usually they are ‘morning’ or ‘afternoon.’ For meetings, it’s something like ‘after Asr prayer,’ meaning sometime after the afternoon prayer (in the Muslim faith) but before the night prayer time.” — Amanda

10. France: “It’s an in-between country. In Paris, when you’re invited to dinner, it’s actually kind of rude to arrive on time — the hostess is probably still in the shower. You’re supposed to be about 15 minutes late, but more than half an hour late is rude. After living in Paris so long, my time sense is French and I find other countries stressful. The French are relatively punctual, but you usually have 15 minutes leeway. Very sensible.” — Julie

You’re going to want to be On Time or Early here

1. Switzerland: “You’ll get a train route with two-minute connections and it all works out just fine. If your train is three minutes late, they’re profusely apologetic.” — Kat

“I was on a tour in Switzerland once where the guide was so time-focused that he kept saying things like ‘We have to go we’ve been here seven minutes already!’ and ‘Hurry up, lunch is waiting!’ Later on, our group was at dinner with a different host and decided to go to a pub afterward. When we asked the host how long it would take to walk there, she said, ‘Eleven-and-a-half minutes.’ Not ’10-15 minutes’ as I would have said, but eleven-and-a-half. That’s how specific the Swiss get about time.” — Annika

2. The Netherlands: “In the Netherlands, you always arrive on time and sometimes even early.” — Olga

3. Japan: “I lived in Japan, and a rule of thumb is that if you arrive five minutes early for anything (a meeting, social engagement, to catch a bus, etc.), you’re on time. If you arrive on time, you’re late. I learned this the hard way by arriving one minute late (I kid you not) for a work event that required a mini-van to transport us to a venue. My one-minute tardiness resulted in the van leaving without me, as it left AT the set meeting time. Also, trains depart literally to the minute (e.g. 10:23am), so if you get to the train station at 10:22am, you have a minute to get on that train, because it starts moving at 10:23.” — Ang

4. Germany: “We were meeting a real estate agent in Munich, and were five minutes late. The agent had left in anger by the time we arrived. And when a German friend came to visit us in NYC, he was mortified because he was three minutes late to dinner.” — Julie

5. South Korea: “I spent a month in Seoul, where restaurants stop accepting customers an hour before they close, things often close early and the trains (. ) run *early* from time to time. I met my friend’s Korean parents, and they were 30 minutes early. I had no idea how to deal.” — Najva

Have you traveled anywhere where the time customs surprised you? Tell us about your experiences @BritandCo!


10 Countries Where It’s NBD to Show Up Late to Everything

One of the best things about traveling the world is getting to learn all about different customs and cultures. From food and social practices to local art, there’s an endless amount to discover about the amazing countries you visit. Part of having those experiences is trial and error, especially when it comes to timing. Whether people arrive on time, a little late or extremely late varies widely from country to country. As a traveler, not knowing when to show up for things can cause problems like missed trains or being super rude, so we decided to poll a travel-savvy group of ladies to find out exactly what clock different countries are on. This is by no means an exhaustive list, but if you happen to be traveling to any of these places, you’ll probably appreciate the heads-up!

COUNTRIES Where it’s 100 PERCENT okay to be Late

1. Greece: “When I studied abroad in Greece, I was warned that the ferry schedules were more of a guideline than something to plan a trip around. Apparently, multi-hour delays were not unheard of. But then again, the easygoing way of life there was part of what I loved about the culture, and there was always someone willing to talk to you while waiting.” — Auburn

2. Nepal: “‘Nepali time’ is just a synonym for being late.” — Elen

3. Spain: “It took me awhile to get used to the fact that I could show up for appointments late when I lived in Spain. I finally learned after about five hair, nail and doctor appointments that if you arrive on time, you’re going to wait at least a half hour anyway. So you might as well just show up 15 to 30 minutes after your scheduled time slot. The same goes for going out to dinner or meeting friends for drinks, except I’d say you should show up at least an hour later than the agreed upon time.” — Rachel

4. Ecuador: “When I was living in Ecuador, the government had to make a rule that you had to be at meetings within some absurd time of when it started (it was like an hour) because they were losing so much productivity from people showing up late. I’ve never been a minute late for anything in my life, so it was quite an adjustment for me.” — Naomi

5. The Republic of Georgia: “I thought I had a tendency to be late… nothing like the Georgians! I lived there off and on in my late 20s. Time itself is basically inconsistent there. ‘Georgia time’ means hours late, but it’s actually on time for them. Buses leave whenever they feel they’re ready to depart. It was surprisingly frustrating at first, but it was a great way to live in the present!” — Crystal

6. Cuba: “My husband is from Havana, and I’ve spent a lot of time there in the last 15 years. During my first trip there, the bus driver stopped to buy fruit and chatted up people at bus stations. The four-hour trip took six. And if anyone says they’ll be ‘right over,’ expect them to take another two hours — minimum.” — Melanie

7. South Africa: “People are always (charmingly) late in Cape Town. It’s a culture of lateness, so much so that there are three different terms for ‘now,’ and not one of them means ‘now’ as we understand it. There is NOW, which means eventually (maybe!) then JUST NOW, which means later and finally NOW NOW, which means soonish. I’m not even sure if there’s actually a term for now, as in this second!” — Sandra

8. The Philippines: “In the Philippines, everyone’s late all the time, especially in the cities. You just can’t predict how long you’ll have to sit in traffic. We could go pick up my cousins at school at 3pm and get home at 4pm, or at 6pm.” — Adrienne

9. Morocco: “There’s no time given for appointments. Usually they are ‘morning’ or ‘afternoon.’ For meetings, it’s something like ‘after Asr prayer,’ meaning sometime after the afternoon prayer (in the Muslim faith) but before the night prayer time.” — Amanda

10. France: “It’s an in-between country. In Paris, when you’re invited to dinner, it’s actually kind of rude to arrive on time — the hostess is probably still in the shower. You’re supposed to be about 15 minutes late, but more than half an hour late is rude. After living in Paris so long, my time sense is French and I find other countries stressful. The French are relatively punctual, but you usually have 15 minutes leeway. Very sensible.” — Julie

You’re going to want to be On Time or Early here

1. Switzerland: “You’ll get a train route with two-minute connections and it all works out just fine. If your train is three minutes late, they’re profusely apologetic.” — Kat

“I was on a tour in Switzerland once where the guide was so time-focused that he kept saying things like ‘We have to go we’ve been here seven minutes already!’ and ‘Hurry up, lunch is waiting!’ Later on, our group was at dinner with a different host and decided to go to a pub afterward. When we asked the host how long it would take to walk there, she said, ‘Eleven-and-a-half minutes.’ Not ’10-15 minutes’ as I would have said, but eleven-and-a-half. That’s how specific the Swiss get about time.” — Annika

2. The Netherlands: “In the Netherlands, you always arrive on time and sometimes even early.” — Olga

3. Japan: “I lived in Japan, and a rule of thumb is that if you arrive five minutes early for anything (a meeting, social engagement, to catch a bus, etc.), you’re on time. If you arrive on time, you’re late. I learned this the hard way by arriving one minute late (I kid you not) for a work event that required a mini-van to transport us to a venue. My one-minute tardiness resulted in the van leaving without me, as it left AT the set meeting time. Also, trains depart literally to the minute (e.g. 10:23am), so if you get to the train station at 10:22am, you have a minute to get on that train, because it starts moving at 10:23.” — Ang

4. Germany: “We were meeting a real estate agent in Munich, and were five minutes late. The agent had left in anger by the time we arrived. And when a German friend came to visit us in NYC, he was mortified because he was three minutes late to dinner.” — Julie

5. South Korea: “I spent a month in Seoul, where restaurants stop accepting customers an hour before they close, things often close early and the trains (. ) run *early* from time to time. I met my friend’s Korean parents, and they were 30 minutes early. I had no idea how to deal.” — Najva

Have you traveled anywhere where the time customs surprised you? Tell us about your experiences @BritandCo!


10 Countries Where It’s NBD to Show Up Late to Everything

One of the best things about traveling the world is getting to learn all about different customs and cultures. From food and social practices to local art, there’s an endless amount to discover about the amazing countries you visit. Part of having those experiences is trial and error, especially when it comes to timing. Whether people arrive on time, a little late or extremely late varies widely from country to country. As a traveler, not knowing when to show up for things can cause problems like missed trains or being super rude, so we decided to poll a travel-savvy group of ladies to find out exactly what clock different countries are on. This is by no means an exhaustive list, but if you happen to be traveling to any of these places, you’ll probably appreciate the heads-up!

COUNTRIES Where it’s 100 PERCENT okay to be Late

1. Greece: “When I studied abroad in Greece, I was warned that the ferry schedules were more of a guideline than something to plan a trip around. Apparently, multi-hour delays were not unheard of. But then again, the easygoing way of life there was part of what I loved about the culture, and there was always someone willing to talk to you while waiting.” — Auburn

2. Nepal: “‘Nepali time’ is just a synonym for being late.” — Elen

3. Spain: “It took me awhile to get used to the fact that I could show up for appointments late when I lived in Spain. I finally learned after about five hair, nail and doctor appointments that if you arrive on time, you’re going to wait at least a half hour anyway. So you might as well just show up 15 to 30 minutes after your scheduled time slot. The same goes for going out to dinner or meeting friends for drinks, except I’d say you should show up at least an hour later than the agreed upon time.” — Rachel

4. Ecuador: “When I was living in Ecuador, the government had to make a rule that you had to be at meetings within some absurd time of when it started (it was like an hour) because they were losing so much productivity from people showing up late. I’ve never been a minute late for anything in my life, so it was quite an adjustment for me.” — Naomi

5. The Republic of Georgia: “I thought I had a tendency to be late… nothing like the Georgians! I lived there off and on in my late 20s. Time itself is basically inconsistent there. ‘Georgia time’ means hours late, but it’s actually on time for them. Buses leave whenever they feel they’re ready to depart. It was surprisingly frustrating at first, but it was a great way to live in the present!” — Crystal

6. Cuba: “My husband is from Havana, and I’ve spent a lot of time there in the last 15 years. During my first trip there, the bus driver stopped to buy fruit and chatted up people at bus stations. The four-hour trip took six. And if anyone says they’ll be ‘right over,’ expect them to take another two hours — minimum.” — Melanie

7. South Africa: “People are always (charmingly) late in Cape Town. It’s a culture of lateness, so much so that there are three different terms for ‘now,’ and not one of them means ‘now’ as we understand it. There is NOW, which means eventually (maybe!) then JUST NOW, which means later and finally NOW NOW, which means soonish. I’m not even sure if there’s actually a term for now, as in this second!” — Sandra

8. The Philippines: “In the Philippines, everyone’s late all the time, especially in the cities. You just can’t predict how long you’ll have to sit in traffic. We could go pick up my cousins at school at 3pm and get home at 4pm, or at 6pm.” — Adrienne

9. Morocco: “There’s no time given for appointments. Usually they are ‘morning’ or ‘afternoon.’ For meetings, it’s something like ‘after Asr prayer,’ meaning sometime after the afternoon prayer (in the Muslim faith) but before the night prayer time.” — Amanda

10. France: “It’s an in-between country. In Paris, when you’re invited to dinner, it’s actually kind of rude to arrive on time — the hostess is probably still in the shower. You’re supposed to be about 15 minutes late, but more than half an hour late is rude. After living in Paris so long, my time sense is French and I find other countries stressful. The French are relatively punctual, but you usually have 15 minutes leeway. Very sensible.” — Julie

You’re going to want to be On Time or Early here

1. Switzerland: “You’ll get a train route with two-minute connections and it all works out just fine. If your train is three minutes late, they’re profusely apologetic.” — Kat

“I was on a tour in Switzerland once where the guide was so time-focused that he kept saying things like ‘We have to go we’ve been here seven minutes already!’ and ‘Hurry up, lunch is waiting!’ Later on, our group was at dinner with a different host and decided to go to a pub afterward. When we asked the host how long it would take to walk there, she said, ‘Eleven-and-a-half minutes.’ Not ’10-15 minutes’ as I would have said, but eleven-and-a-half. That’s how specific the Swiss get about time.” — Annika

2. The Netherlands: “In the Netherlands, you always arrive on time and sometimes even early.” — Olga

3. Japan: “I lived in Japan, and a rule of thumb is that if you arrive five minutes early for anything (a meeting, social engagement, to catch a bus, etc.), you’re on time. If you arrive on time, you’re late. I learned this the hard way by arriving one minute late (I kid you not) for a work event that required a mini-van to transport us to a venue. My one-minute tardiness resulted in the van leaving without me, as it left AT the set meeting time. Also, trains depart literally to the minute (e.g. 10:23am), so if you get to the train station at 10:22am, you have a minute to get on that train, because it starts moving at 10:23.” — Ang

4. Germany: “We were meeting a real estate agent in Munich, and were five minutes late. The agent had left in anger by the time we arrived. And when a German friend came to visit us in NYC, he was mortified because he was three minutes late to dinner.” — Julie

5. South Korea: “I spent a month in Seoul, where restaurants stop accepting customers an hour before they close, things often close early and the trains (. ) run *early* from time to time. I met my friend’s Korean parents, and they were 30 minutes early. I had no idea how to deal.” — Najva

Have you traveled anywhere where the time customs surprised you? Tell us about your experiences @BritandCo!


10 Countries Where It’s NBD to Show Up Late to Everything

One of the best things about traveling the world is getting to learn all about different customs and cultures. From food and social practices to local art, there’s an endless amount to discover about the amazing countries you visit. Part of having those experiences is trial and error, especially when it comes to timing. Whether people arrive on time, a little late or extremely late varies widely from country to country. As a traveler, not knowing when to show up for things can cause problems like missed trains or being super rude, so we decided to poll a travel-savvy group of ladies to find out exactly what clock different countries are on. This is by no means an exhaustive list, but if you happen to be traveling to any of these places, you’ll probably appreciate the heads-up!

COUNTRIES Where it’s 100 PERCENT okay to be Late

1. Greece: “When I studied abroad in Greece, I was warned that the ferry schedules were more of a guideline than something to plan a trip around. Apparently, multi-hour delays were not unheard of. But then again, the easygoing way of life there was part of what I loved about the culture, and there was always someone willing to talk to you while waiting.” — Auburn

2. Nepal: “‘Nepali time’ is just a synonym for being late.” — Elen

3. Spain: “It took me awhile to get used to the fact that I could show up for appointments late when I lived in Spain. I finally learned after about five hair, nail and doctor appointments that if you arrive on time, you’re going to wait at least a half hour anyway. So you might as well just show up 15 to 30 minutes after your scheduled time slot. The same goes for going out to dinner or meeting friends for drinks, except I’d say you should show up at least an hour later than the agreed upon time.” — Rachel

4. Ecuador: “When I was living in Ecuador, the government had to make a rule that you had to be at meetings within some absurd time of when it started (it was like an hour) because they were losing so much productivity from people showing up late. I’ve never been a minute late for anything in my life, so it was quite an adjustment for me.” — Naomi

5. The Republic of Georgia: “I thought I had a tendency to be late… nothing like the Georgians! I lived there off and on in my late 20s. Time itself is basically inconsistent there. ‘Georgia time’ means hours late, but it’s actually on time for them. Buses leave whenever they feel they’re ready to depart. It was surprisingly frustrating at first, but it was a great way to live in the present!” — Crystal

6. Cuba: “My husband is from Havana, and I’ve spent a lot of time there in the last 15 years. During my first trip there, the bus driver stopped to buy fruit and chatted up people at bus stations. The four-hour trip took six. And if anyone says they’ll be ‘right over,’ expect them to take another two hours — minimum.” — Melanie

7. South Africa: “People are always (charmingly) late in Cape Town. It’s a culture of lateness, so much so that there are three different terms for ‘now,’ and not one of them means ‘now’ as we understand it. There is NOW, which means eventually (maybe!) then JUST NOW, which means later and finally NOW NOW, which means soonish. I’m not even sure if there’s actually a term for now, as in this second!” — Sandra

8. The Philippines: “In the Philippines, everyone’s late all the time, especially in the cities. You just can’t predict how long you’ll have to sit in traffic. We could go pick up my cousins at school at 3pm and get home at 4pm, or at 6pm.” — Adrienne

9. Morocco: “There’s no time given for appointments. Usually they are ‘morning’ or ‘afternoon.’ For meetings, it’s something like ‘after Asr prayer,’ meaning sometime after the afternoon prayer (in the Muslim faith) but before the night prayer time.” — Amanda

10. France: “It’s an in-between country. In Paris, when you’re invited to dinner, it’s actually kind of rude to arrive on time — the hostess is probably still in the shower. You’re supposed to be about 15 minutes late, but more than half an hour late is rude. After living in Paris so long, my time sense is French and I find other countries stressful. The French are relatively punctual, but you usually have 15 minutes leeway. Very sensible.” — Julie

You’re going to want to be On Time or Early here

1. Switzerland: “You’ll get a train route with two-minute connections and it all works out just fine. If your train is three minutes late, they’re profusely apologetic.” — Kat

“I was on a tour in Switzerland once where the guide was so time-focused that he kept saying things like ‘We have to go we’ve been here seven minutes already!’ and ‘Hurry up, lunch is waiting!’ Later on, our group was at dinner with a different host and decided to go to a pub afterward. When we asked the host how long it would take to walk there, she said, ‘Eleven-and-a-half minutes.’ Not ’10-15 minutes’ as I would have said, but eleven-and-a-half. That’s how specific the Swiss get about time.” — Annika

2. The Netherlands: “In the Netherlands, you always arrive on time and sometimes even early.” — Olga

3. Japan: “I lived in Japan, and a rule of thumb is that if you arrive five minutes early for anything (a meeting, social engagement, to catch a bus, etc.), you’re on time. If you arrive on time, you’re late. I learned this the hard way by arriving one minute late (I kid you not) for a work event that required a mini-van to transport us to a venue. My one-minute tardiness resulted in the van leaving without me, as it left AT the set meeting time. Also, trains depart literally to the minute (e.g. 10:23am), so if you get to the train station at 10:22am, you have a minute to get on that train, because it starts moving at 10:23.” — Ang

4. Germany: “We were meeting a real estate agent in Munich, and were five minutes late. The agent had left in anger by the time we arrived. And when a German friend came to visit us in NYC, he was mortified because he was three minutes late to dinner.” — Julie

5. South Korea: “I spent a month in Seoul, where restaurants stop accepting customers an hour before they close, things often close early and the trains (. ) run *early* from time to time. I met my friend’s Korean parents, and they were 30 minutes early. I had no idea how to deal.” — Najva

Have you traveled anywhere where the time customs surprised you? Tell us about your experiences @BritandCo!


10 Countries Where It’s NBD to Show Up Late to Everything

One of the best things about traveling the world is getting to learn all about different customs and cultures. From food and social practices to local art, there’s an endless amount to discover about the amazing countries you visit. Part of having those experiences is trial and error, especially when it comes to timing. Whether people arrive on time, a little late or extremely late varies widely from country to country. As a traveler, not knowing when to show up for things can cause problems like missed trains or being super rude, so we decided to poll a travel-savvy group of ladies to find out exactly what clock different countries are on. This is by no means an exhaustive list, but if you happen to be traveling to any of these places, you’ll probably appreciate the heads-up!

COUNTRIES Where it’s 100 PERCENT okay to be Late

1. Greece: “When I studied abroad in Greece, I was warned that the ferry schedules were more of a guideline than something to plan a trip around. Apparently, multi-hour delays were not unheard of. But then again, the easygoing way of life there was part of what I loved about the culture, and there was always someone willing to talk to you while waiting.” — Auburn

2. Nepal: “‘Nepali time’ is just a synonym for being late.” — Elen

3. Spain: “It took me awhile to get used to the fact that I could show up for appointments late when I lived in Spain. I finally learned after about five hair, nail and doctor appointments that if you arrive on time, you’re going to wait at least a half hour anyway. So you might as well just show up 15 to 30 minutes after your scheduled time slot. The same goes for going out to dinner or meeting friends for drinks, except I’d say you should show up at least an hour later than the agreed upon time.” — Rachel

4. Ecuador: “When I was living in Ecuador, the government had to make a rule that you had to be at meetings within some absurd time of when it started (it was like an hour) because they were losing so much productivity from people showing up late. I’ve never been a minute late for anything in my life, so it was quite an adjustment for me.” — Naomi

5. The Republic of Georgia: “I thought I had a tendency to be late… nothing like the Georgians! I lived there off and on in my late 20s. Time itself is basically inconsistent there. ‘Georgia time’ means hours late, but it’s actually on time for them. Buses leave whenever they feel they’re ready to depart. It was surprisingly frustrating at first, but it was a great way to live in the present!” — Crystal

6. Cuba: “My husband is from Havana, and I’ve spent a lot of time there in the last 15 years. During my first trip there, the bus driver stopped to buy fruit and chatted up people at bus stations. The four-hour trip took six. And if anyone says they’ll be ‘right over,’ expect them to take another two hours — minimum.” — Melanie

7. South Africa: “People are always (charmingly) late in Cape Town. It’s a culture of lateness, so much so that there are three different terms for ‘now,’ and not one of them means ‘now’ as we understand it. There is NOW, which means eventually (maybe!) then JUST NOW, which means later and finally NOW NOW, which means soonish. I’m not even sure if there’s actually a term for now, as in this second!” — Sandra

8. The Philippines: “In the Philippines, everyone’s late all the time, especially in the cities. You just can’t predict how long you’ll have to sit in traffic. We could go pick up my cousins at school at 3pm and get home at 4pm, or at 6pm.” — Adrienne

9. Morocco: “There’s no time given for appointments. Usually they are ‘morning’ or ‘afternoon.’ For meetings, it’s something like ‘after Asr prayer,’ meaning sometime after the afternoon prayer (in the Muslim faith) but before the night prayer time.” — Amanda

10. France: “It’s an in-between country. In Paris, when you’re invited to dinner, it’s actually kind of rude to arrive on time — the hostess is probably still in the shower. You’re supposed to be about 15 minutes late, but more than half an hour late is rude. After living in Paris so long, my time sense is French and I find other countries stressful. The French are relatively punctual, but you usually have 15 minutes leeway. Very sensible.” — Julie

You’re going to want to be On Time or Early here

1. Switzerland: “You’ll get a train route with two-minute connections and it all works out just fine. If your train is three minutes late, they’re profusely apologetic.” — Kat

“I was on a tour in Switzerland once where the guide was so time-focused that he kept saying things like ‘We have to go we’ve been here seven minutes already!’ and ‘Hurry up, lunch is waiting!’ Later on, our group was at dinner with a different host and decided to go to a pub afterward. When we asked the host how long it would take to walk there, she said, ‘Eleven-and-a-half minutes.’ Not ’10-15 minutes’ as I would have said, but eleven-and-a-half. That’s how specific the Swiss get about time.” — Annika

2. The Netherlands: “In the Netherlands, you always arrive on time and sometimes even early.” — Olga

3. Japan: “I lived in Japan, and a rule of thumb is that if you arrive five minutes early for anything (a meeting, social engagement, to catch a bus, etc.), you’re on time. If you arrive on time, you’re late. I learned this the hard way by arriving one minute late (I kid you not) for a work event that required a mini-van to transport us to a venue. My one-minute tardiness resulted in the van leaving without me, as it left AT the set meeting time. Also, trains depart literally to the minute (e.g. 10:23am), so if you get to the train station at 10:22am, you have a minute to get on that train, because it starts moving at 10:23.” — Ang

4. Germany: “We were meeting a real estate agent in Munich, and were five minutes late. The agent had left in anger by the time we arrived. And when a German friend came to visit us in NYC, he was mortified because he was three minutes late to dinner.” — Julie

5. South Korea: “I spent a month in Seoul, where restaurants stop accepting customers an hour before they close, things often close early and the trains (. ) run *early* from time to time. I met my friend’s Korean parents, and they were 30 minutes early. I had no idea how to deal.” — Najva

Have you traveled anywhere where the time customs surprised you? Tell us about your experiences @BritandCo!


10 Countries Where It’s NBD to Show Up Late to Everything

One of the best things about traveling the world is getting to learn all about different customs and cultures. From food and social practices to local art, there’s an endless amount to discover about the amazing countries you visit. Part of having those experiences is trial and error, especially when it comes to timing. Whether people arrive on time, a little late or extremely late varies widely from country to country. As a traveler, not knowing when to show up for things can cause problems like missed trains or being super rude, so we decided to poll a travel-savvy group of ladies to find out exactly what clock different countries are on. This is by no means an exhaustive list, but if you happen to be traveling to any of these places, you’ll probably appreciate the heads-up!

COUNTRIES Where it’s 100 PERCENT okay to be Late

1. Greece: “When I studied abroad in Greece, I was warned that the ferry schedules were more of a guideline than something to plan a trip around. Apparently, multi-hour delays were not unheard of. But then again, the easygoing way of life there was part of what I loved about the culture, and there was always someone willing to talk to you while waiting.” — Auburn

2. Nepal: “‘Nepali time’ is just a synonym for being late.” — Elen

3. Spain: “It took me awhile to get used to the fact that I could show up for appointments late when I lived in Spain. I finally learned after about five hair, nail and doctor appointments that if you arrive on time, you’re going to wait at least a half hour anyway. So you might as well just show up 15 to 30 minutes after your scheduled time slot. The same goes for going out to dinner or meeting friends for drinks, except I’d say you should show up at least an hour later than the agreed upon time.” — Rachel

4. Ecuador: “When I was living in Ecuador, the government had to make a rule that you had to be at meetings within some absurd time of when it started (it was like an hour) because they were losing so much productivity from people showing up late. I’ve never been a minute late for anything in my life, so it was quite an adjustment for me.” — Naomi

5. The Republic of Georgia: “I thought I had a tendency to be late… nothing like the Georgians! I lived there off and on in my late 20s. Time itself is basically inconsistent there. ‘Georgia time’ means hours late, but it’s actually on time for them. Buses leave whenever they feel they’re ready to depart. It was surprisingly frustrating at first, but it was a great way to live in the present!” — Crystal

6. Cuba: “My husband is from Havana, and I’ve spent a lot of time there in the last 15 years. During my first trip there, the bus driver stopped to buy fruit and chatted up people at bus stations. The four-hour trip took six. And if anyone says they’ll be ‘right over,’ expect them to take another two hours — minimum.” — Melanie

7. South Africa: “People are always (charmingly) late in Cape Town. It’s a culture of lateness, so much so that there are three different terms for ‘now,’ and not one of them means ‘now’ as we understand it. There is NOW, which means eventually (maybe!) then JUST NOW, which means later and finally NOW NOW, which means soonish. I’m not even sure if there’s actually a term for now, as in this second!” — Sandra

8. The Philippines: “In the Philippines, everyone’s late all the time, especially in the cities. You just can’t predict how long you’ll have to sit in traffic. We could go pick up my cousins at school at 3pm and get home at 4pm, or at 6pm.” — Adrienne

9. Morocco: “There’s no time given for appointments. Usually they are ‘morning’ or ‘afternoon.’ For meetings, it’s something like ‘after Asr prayer,’ meaning sometime after the afternoon prayer (in the Muslim faith) but before the night prayer time.” — Amanda

10. France: “It’s an in-between country. In Paris, when you’re invited to dinner, it’s actually kind of rude to arrive on time — the hostess is probably still in the shower. You’re supposed to be about 15 minutes late, but more than half an hour late is rude. After living in Paris so long, my time sense is French and I find other countries stressful. The French are relatively punctual, but you usually have 15 minutes leeway. Very sensible.” — Julie

You’re going to want to be On Time or Early here

1. Switzerland: “You’ll get a train route with two-minute connections and it all works out just fine. If your train is three minutes late, they’re profusely apologetic.” — Kat

“I was on a tour in Switzerland once where the guide was so time-focused that he kept saying things like ‘We have to go we’ve been here seven minutes already!’ and ‘Hurry up, lunch is waiting!’ Later on, our group was at dinner with a different host and decided to go to a pub afterward. When we asked the host how long it would take to walk there, she said, ‘Eleven-and-a-half minutes.’ Not ’10-15 minutes’ as I would have said, but eleven-and-a-half. That’s how specific the Swiss get about time.” — Annika

2. The Netherlands: “In the Netherlands, you always arrive on time and sometimes even early.” — Olga

3. Japan: “I lived in Japan, and a rule of thumb is that if you arrive five minutes early for anything (a meeting, social engagement, to catch a bus, etc.), you’re on time. If you arrive on time, you’re late. I learned this the hard way by arriving one minute late (I kid you not) for a work event that required a mini-van to transport us to a venue. My one-minute tardiness resulted in the van leaving without me, as it left AT the set meeting time. Also, trains depart literally to the minute (e.g. 10:23am), so if you get to the train station at 10:22am, you have a minute to get on that train, because it starts moving at 10:23.” — Ang

4. Germany: “We were meeting a real estate agent in Munich, and were five minutes late. The agent had left in anger by the time we arrived. And when a German friend came to visit us in NYC, he was mortified because he was three minutes late to dinner.” — Julie

5. South Korea: “I spent a month in Seoul, where restaurants stop accepting customers an hour before they close, things often close early and the trains (. ) run *early* from time to time. I met my friend’s Korean parents, and they were 30 minutes early. I had no idea how to deal.” — Najva

Have you traveled anywhere where the time customs surprised you? Tell us about your experiences @BritandCo!


10 Countries Where It’s NBD to Show Up Late to Everything

One of the best things about traveling the world is getting to learn all about different customs and cultures. From food and social practices to local art, there’s an endless amount to discover about the amazing countries you visit. Part of having those experiences is trial and error, especially when it comes to timing. Whether people arrive on time, a little late or extremely late varies widely from country to country. As a traveler, not knowing when to show up for things can cause problems like missed trains or being super rude, so we decided to poll a travel-savvy group of ladies to find out exactly what clock different countries are on. This is by no means an exhaustive list, but if you happen to be traveling to any of these places, you’ll probably appreciate the heads-up!

COUNTRIES Where it’s 100 PERCENT okay to be Late

1. Greece: “When I studied abroad in Greece, I was warned that the ferry schedules were more of a guideline than something to plan a trip around. Apparently, multi-hour delays were not unheard of. But then again, the easygoing way of life there was part of what I loved about the culture, and there was always someone willing to talk to you while waiting.” — Auburn

2. Nepal: “‘Nepali time’ is just a synonym for being late.” — Elen

3. Spain: “It took me awhile to get used to the fact that I could show up for appointments late when I lived in Spain. I finally learned after about five hair, nail and doctor appointments that if you arrive on time, you’re going to wait at least a half hour anyway. So you might as well just show up 15 to 30 minutes after your scheduled time slot. The same goes for going out to dinner or meeting friends for drinks, except I’d say you should show up at least an hour later than the agreed upon time.” — Rachel

4. Ecuador: “When I was living in Ecuador, the government had to make a rule that you had to be at meetings within some absurd time of when it started (it was like an hour) because they were losing so much productivity from people showing up late. I’ve never been a minute late for anything in my life, so it was quite an adjustment for me.” — Naomi

5. The Republic of Georgia: “I thought I had a tendency to be late… nothing like the Georgians! I lived there off and on in my late 20s. Time itself is basically inconsistent there. ‘Georgia time’ means hours late, but it’s actually on time for them. Buses leave whenever they feel they’re ready to depart. It was surprisingly frustrating at first, but it was a great way to live in the present!” — Crystal

6. Cuba: “My husband is from Havana, and I’ve spent a lot of time there in the last 15 years. During my first trip there, the bus driver stopped to buy fruit and chatted up people at bus stations. The four-hour trip took six. And if anyone says they’ll be ‘right over,’ expect them to take another two hours — minimum.” — Melanie

7. South Africa: “People are always (charmingly) late in Cape Town. It’s a culture of lateness, so much so that there are three different terms for ‘now,’ and not one of them means ‘now’ as we understand it. There is NOW, which means eventually (maybe!) then JUST NOW, which means later and finally NOW NOW, which means soonish. I’m not even sure if there’s actually a term for now, as in this second!” — Sandra

8. The Philippines: “In the Philippines, everyone’s late all the time, especially in the cities. You just can’t predict how long you’ll have to sit in traffic. We could go pick up my cousins at school at 3pm and get home at 4pm, or at 6pm.” — Adrienne

9. Morocco: “There’s no time given for appointments. Usually they are ‘morning’ or ‘afternoon.’ For meetings, it’s something like ‘after Asr prayer,’ meaning sometime after the afternoon prayer (in the Muslim faith) but before the night prayer time.” — Amanda

10. France: “It’s an in-between country. In Paris, when you’re invited to dinner, it’s actually kind of rude to arrive on time — the hostess is probably still in the shower. You’re supposed to be about 15 minutes late, but more than half an hour late is rude. After living in Paris so long, my time sense is French and I find other countries stressful. The French are relatively punctual, but you usually have 15 minutes leeway. Very sensible.” — Julie

You’re going to want to be On Time or Early here

1. Switzerland: “You’ll get a train route with two-minute connections and it all works out just fine. If your train is three minutes late, they’re profusely apologetic.” — Kat

“I was on a tour in Switzerland once where the guide was so time-focused that he kept saying things like ‘We have to go we’ve been here seven minutes already!’ and ‘Hurry up, lunch is waiting!’ Later on, our group was at dinner with a different host and decided to go to a pub afterward. When we asked the host how long it would take to walk there, she said, ‘Eleven-and-a-half minutes.’ Not ’10-15 minutes’ as I would have said, but eleven-and-a-half. That’s how specific the Swiss get about time.” — Annika

2. The Netherlands: “In the Netherlands, you always arrive on time and sometimes even early.” — Olga

3. Japan: “I lived in Japan, and a rule of thumb is that if you arrive five minutes early for anything (a meeting, social engagement, to catch a bus, etc.), you’re on time. If you arrive on time, you’re late. I learned this the hard way by arriving one minute late (I kid you not) for a work event that required a mini-van to transport us to a venue. My one-minute tardiness resulted in the van leaving without me, as it left AT the set meeting time. Also, trains depart literally to the minute (e.g. 10:23am), so if you get to the train station at 10:22am, you have a minute to get on that train, because it starts moving at 10:23.” — Ang

4. Germany: “We were meeting a real estate agent in Munich, and were five minutes late. The agent had left in anger by the time we arrived. And when a German friend came to visit us in NYC, he was mortified because he was three minutes late to dinner.” — Julie

5. South Korea: “I spent a month in Seoul, where restaurants stop accepting customers an hour before they close, things often close early and the trains (. ) run *early* from time to time. I met my friend’s Korean parents, and they were 30 minutes early. I had no idea how to deal.” — Najva

Have you traveled anywhere where the time customs surprised you? Tell us about your experiences @BritandCo!


Watch the video: 15 Most Unique Beaches In The World (May 2022).


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