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Matzo balls recipe


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  • Dish type
  • Side dish

Matzo meal is combined with beaten egg, pareve margarine, salt and water. Shape into balls, then cook in your favourite chicken soup.

12 people made this

IngredientsServes: 7

  • 3 tablespoons pareve margarine, melted
  • 2 eggs
  • 125g matzo meal
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 125ml water, or as needed

MethodPrep:15min ›Cook:15min ›Ready in:30min

  1. In a medium bowl, whisk together the margarine and eggs until well blended. Combine the matzo meal and salt; lightly stir into the egg mixture until the liquid is absorbed, and the meal is damp. Gradually mix in the water so that the mixture holds together, but is not too wet. Cover and refrigerate while bringing the water to the boil.
  2. Bring a large pot of lightly salted water to the boil. When the water is at a full boil, remove the matzo mixture from the refrigerator. Using wet hands, shape spoonfuls of the dough into balls. Do not pack the balls together too tightly.
  3. Drop balls into the boiling water, and boil for 15 minutes. Remove from water and serve in soup or cold milk. Do not let the matzo balls sit out too long, or they will harden.

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(10)

Reviews in English (8)

An excellent recipe I boiled them in chicken stock to make them even more delicious!-22 Feb 2014

by Chef4Six

I changed this recipe a bit - My family likes small light and fluffy matzo balls. I quadrupled the recipe. I used selter instead of water - as the carbonated water helps to fluff up the matzo balls. I used only a tsp. of olive oil instead of the margarine and added some salt, pepper and garlic powder to the mixture. I refrigerated the mixture for about 1/2 hour and rolled them into small balls with wet hands to help keep their shape. I let them boil in slated water with the pot cover on for about 25 minutes - no peaking - or the matzo balls will flip and fall to the bottom of the pot. I did not cook the matzo balls in the chicken soup - as I did not want the soup to become murky from the matzo balls as they cooked. I also froze them in a single layer on cookie sheet and then placed them in a zip lock bag - this way I can take out as many matzo balls as I wanted and they wouldn't be stuck together.-19 Apr 2009

by mjo

This receipe will give you "sinkers"- if you want floaters -3 eggs no oil, very little water, 1/2 C matzo meal. Refrigerate 20-30min. Drop in rapidly boiling water/chicken soup cover cook for 20 minutes. The larger the pot the better. - If yor soup has the veggies removed make it in the soup.-26 Apr 2008


Knaidlach (Matzoh Balls)

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The world is divided into those who love floaters and those who love sinkers. While the delicate floaters are favored by matzoh ball mavens everywhere, I am a closet sinker-lover, which is the way my father’s mother, Grandma Ruchel, made them. Which is not to say I haven’t gobbled with gusto a floater or two in my day. Aunt Irene’s are definitely floaters. Some say club soda makes for a lighter knaidel. Cooking them longer will make them lighter too.

Note: For Passover use kosher-for-Passover baking powder. If none is available, it may be omitted.

Recipes in Judy Bart Kancigor’s book Cooking Jewish were compiled from over 300 family members and friends. This recipe is by Irene Rosenthal.

See how Joyce Goldstein makes matzoh balls. This dish was featured as part of our Hanukkah Recipes photo gallery.


Matzo Recipes for Passover: Matzo Balls As Seen On The Today Show

My cousin Bracha gave me this recipe for light, fluffy and perfectly round matzo balls when I moved to Israel and asked her where to find matzo ball mix. I will NEVER go back to making Matzo Balls from a mix again.  Watch me make these matzo balls on the Today Show. 

Looking for my best ever matzo ball soup recipe? It combines these matzo balls with my crystal clear chicken soup.  

  • 40min Duration
  • 30min Cook Time
  • 10min Prep Time
  • 12 matzo balls Servings

Ingredients

Preparation

1. In a medium mixing bowl beat eggs with a fork for 30 to 60 seconds.

2. Add seltzer and evoo and beat together another 15 to 30 seconds.

3. Add matzo meal and mix together until just combined, don't overmix. Cover and place in the refrigerator for 30 minutes or until firm.

4. In a medium sized pot bring 3 quarts of well-salted water to a rolling boil. Reduce heat to a simmer.

5. With wet or well oiled hands form matzo balls by gently rolling a spoonful of matzo ball batter to approximately 1-inch in diameter in the palm of your hands.

6. Drop matzo balls carefully into simmering salt water one at a time. Cover the pot and cook for 30 to 40 minutes.

7. Ladle into soup bowls with your favorite soup or use your favorite broth.


    • 1 tablespoon plus 1/4 teaspoon salt
    • 4 large eggs
    • 1/3 cup schmaltz
    • 1/4 teaspoon pepper
    • 1 tablespoon baking powder
    • 1 1/3 cups matzo meal
    1. Fill a large, wide stockpot three-quarters full of water, add 1 tablespoon of the salt, and bring to a rapid boil.
    2. While water is boiling, crack eggs into a large bowl and beat thoroughly. Beat in schmaltz, 1/4 teaspoon salt, pepper, and baking powder. Slowly fold in matzo meal, mixing vigorously until completely blended.
    3. Wet hands and, folding the mixture in your palms, shape perfect balls about 1 1/4 inches in diameter (they will double in size when cooked). Gently place the matzo balls in the boiling water, and reduce heat to a simmer.
    4. Cook for 25 minutes. Remove with a slotted spoon and place 1 or 2 in each bowl of soup. Serve immediately.

    Nutritional analysis provided by TasteBook, using the USDA Nutrition Database

    The Second Avenue Deli Cookbook by Sharon Lebewohl, Rena Bulkin and Jack Lebewohl. Copyright © 1999 by Sharon Lebewohl, Rena Bulkin and Jack Lebewohl. Published by Random House Publishing Group. All Rights Reserved.

    Born with a soupspoon in her mouth, Sharon Lebewohl grew up in the deli business, working at the Second Avenue Deli and learning her father's secret recipes firsthand. Since her father's death in 1996, Sharon has worked with his brother, Jack, to oversee the Deli's daily operations and to ensure that her father's spirit is kept alive there. She is deeply rooted in the Jewish community and is active in many Jewish women's groups. Sharon is also the mother of three teenagers.

    Rena Bulkin began her career in Paris, writing about European hotels and restaurants for The New York Times International Edition . Returning to her native Manhattan after several years abroad, she worked first at The New Yorker and then at New York magazine. She has written fifteen Arthur Frommer travel guides, as well as numerous magazine articles on travel, food, and other subjects. A close friend of the late Abe Lebewohl's, she has a long history with the Second Avenue Deli, where she has worked on many public-relations campaigns.


    These matzo balls are perfectly light and fluffy just like the stuff you get out of a box. Matzo balls really don't get better than this!

    Ingredients

    • 1 cup matzo meal
    • 2 teaspoon baking powder
    • 1/2 teaspoon salt
    • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
    • 1/2 teaspoon onion powder
    • 4 large eggs
    • 1/4 cup oil or melted schmaltz
    • 1/4 cup water or stock

    Instructions

    1. In a large mixing bowl, add matzo meal, baking powder, salt, garlic powder, and onion powder. Whisk to combine.
    2. Add eggs, water, and schmaltz or oil. Mix with a fork until combined.
    3. Chill for 20 minutes or longer. Fill a wide pot with water or stock and bring to a boil.
    4. With wet hands, take some of the mix and mold it into the size of a ping-pong ball. Gently drop it into the boiling water. Repeat until done.
    5. Reduce the heat to a simmer. Cook 20 minutes or until a toothpick goes smoothly through a little passed the center of the matzo balls.

    Notes

    If you don't want to chill the mix, you can let it sit out at room temperature. Letting the mix chill makes the mix less sticky.


    Recipe: Matzo Balls from 2nd Ave. Deli

    A Jewish tradition, from the kitchens of a New York City landmark, 2nd Ave. Deli.

    Matzo Balls
    Yield: 12 to 14

    1 tablespoon salt
    4 large eggs
    1/3 cup schmaltz
    1/4 teaspoon salt
    1/4 teaspoon pepper
    1 tablespoon baking powder
    1 1/3 cup matzo meal

    1. Fill a large, wide stockpot three-quarters full of water, add tablespoon of salt, and bring to a rapid boil.

    Food & Wine

    2. While water is boiling, crack eggs into a large bowl and beat thoroughly. Beat in schmaltz, 1/4 teaspoon salt, pepper, and baking powder. Slowly fold in matzo meal, mixing vigorously until completely blended. Refrigerate mixture for 30 minutes.

    3. Wet hands, and folding the mixture in your palms, shape perfect balls about 1 1/4 inches in diameter (they will double in size when cooked). Gently place the matzo balls in the boiling water, and reduce heat to a simmer. Cook for 25 minutes. Remove with a slotted spoon and place one or two in each bowl of soup. Serve immediately.


    Step 1: In a large bowl, combine 1 pound ground white chicken or white turkey, 2 eggs, 1/2 teaspoon salt, 1 cooked and mashed potato, and 1 small diced (or pureed) onion. Mix well. Refrigerate, covered, for about two hours or more.

    Step 2: Bring a large pot of salted water to a rapid boil. (Alternately, you can make these directly into a pot of boiling chicken soup.) They do expand somewhat so ensure your pot is large enough.

    Step 3: Using wet hands, form small balls and drop them gently into the boiling liquid. Cook for 35 to 45 minutes.

    Step 4: You may then drain them and freeze in plastic bags until later use, or just add to the soup pot about 45 minutes before it finishes cooking.


    In a medium mixing bowl, beat eggs with a fork for 30 to 60 seconds.

    Add seltzer and oil to the mixture and beat together another 15 to 30 seconds.

    Add matzo meal and mix together until just combined, and make sure that you don't over-mix. Cover the mixture and place it in the refrigerator for 30 minutes or until firm.

    In a medium sized pot, bring 3 quarts of well-salted water to a rolling boil. Reduce heat to a simmer.

    With wet or well oiled hands, form matzo balls by gently rolling a spoonful of matzo ball batter to make a ball that's approximately 1-inch in diameter in the palm of your hands.

    Drop matzo balls carefully into the simmering salt water one at a time. Cover the pot and cook for 30 to 40 minutes.


    Step 1: Place 4 eggs into your beater (or use your hand beater) and beat them until light and fluffy. You needn't separate the eggs.

    Step 2: Turn off the mixer and add in 1 cup matzah meal, 1/2 cup water, 5 to 6 tablespoons oil, 1/2 teaspoon onion powder (optional), 1 small sprig of fresh chopped dill (optional), and a small pinch of salt and pepper. Stir by hand at this point so that the eggs will still retain some fluffiness. The mixture is sure to fall that is fine.

    Step 3: Place mixture in the fridge for 1 hour or more.

    Step 4: Bring a large pot of salted water to a rapid boil. Use a large pot as these matzah balls will grow a lot and need a lot of room to expand. Using wet hands, form small balls and drop them gently into the boiling liquid. Let them boil rapidly for 30 minutes.

    Step 5: Remove gently from the pot, drain and cool. These may now be frozen in plastic bags and removed for use as needed. I usually add mine to my soup, straight from the freezer, about a half hour or so before I turn the soup off.


    CAN YOU USE BAKING POWDER ON PASSOVER?

    Absolutely! As long as the box is marked kosher for Passover with a &ldquoP&rdquo next to the kosher symbol.

    I get this question a lot because of the fact that it is a leavener.

    The truth is though, while laws regarding Passover are complex, the focus is on wheat flour rather than the leavener itself.

    In fact, the there wasn&rsquot anything to leaven bread in ancient times except wild yeast.

    So, the bread they were making was something of a sour dough bread.

    This is the reason it took so long to rise.