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The White Russian Recipe

The White Russian Recipe


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We know: you want to be like The Dude. We know what you want a cocktail — and not just any cocktail — you want the White Russian, to be precise.

Ingredients

  • 1 Ounce Kahlua
  • 2 Ounces vodka
  • Heavy cream

Directions

Fill an old-fashioned glass partway with ice. Add the Kahlua and the vodka, top with a solid splash of heavy cream, stir, and enjoy.


The Enduring Legacy of the White Russian Cocktail

The White Russian, a combination of vodka, coffee liqueur and cream, is comfort food in a glass. Warming in the winter, refreshing like a cold milkshake on a summer day, there’s a reason this cocktail has endured through decades of shifts in cocktail tastes and pop culture references.

The drink is said to have been created as a riff on the Black Russian, a drink composed of vodka and coffee liqueur, and thought to date to Belgium in 1949. While the cocktail has no connection to its namesake country beyond the use of vodka, the recipe was appropriated by coffee liqueur companies that sought recipes to promote their lines, most notably now-defunct brand Coffee Southern.

The White Russian maintained modest popularity throughout the decades to follow but found renewed cultural awareness after featuring prominently in the cult 1998 film The Big Lebowski. The drink’s place in it has since become the subject of academic study, down to dissertations on the decision to float or mix the cream. What’s worth noting is that while other cocktails have seen their popularity ruined, or forever stigmatized, by attachment to pop culture properties, 23 years after The Big Lebowski’s release the White Russian remains as popular as ever.

One possible explanation for the cocktail’s endurance is its simplicity and accessibility. A White Russian is as suitable for a brunch accompaniment as an after-dinner digestif. Its ingredients are a perfect triangle of equal parts but can easily be adjusted to taste, or free-poured without measuring, and still yield a perfectly tasty drink. And, unlike similar cocktails like the Brandy Alexander, which shares a boozy milkshake-like profile, the ingredients are widespread enough that you can expect to find them in most home bars. It’s why, of all the outlandish aspects of the film, the least surprising aspect is that The Dude would find a bottle of vodka, a bottle of Kahlúa and some sort of milk wherever he ended up.

Here we opt for a floated White Russian, primarily because it photographs well. If you’re looking for a creamier head to the drink, shake the cream separately before pouring over the other ingredients. But also, feel free to shake, stir or combine the ingredients in any way you see fit. It’s a White Russian—you’re not going to screw this up.

Stir together vodka and coffee liqueur in rocks glass filled with ice. Top with cream, poured slowly into glass, or over the back of a spoon, to float. Optionally, substitute cream with half-and-half or whole milk if a thinner drink is desired). The drink doesn’t require a garnish, but feel free to add crushed cacao nibs or dust with cocoa powder.


This drink recipe was submitted by one of our damn fine readers, jst83!

At some point in the film wasnt The Dude making his white russians with powdered coffee creamer?

The way it's made is exactly how The Dude does it. You need to make it exactly like that.

This is just a standard recipe for a White Russian. The Dude's version, which he calls a "Caucasian" is the same except is made with half-and-half cream specifically.

Is this supposed to be any different than a regular White Russian? The recipe seems to be the same. 1 1/2 oz Vodka, 1/2 Oz Kahlua, splash of cream, build on ice.

This is perfect. The idea of making the drink in your glass first is great, makes sure your proportions are perfect. Simple, great tasting, and awesome. The Dude abides.

Serving size: 250 mL (1 cup)

* : Percent daily values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your diet needs.


Classic Kahlua Cocktail Drinks: The "White Russian" Recipe a classic vintage cocktail.

Kahula Recipes: How to make the White Russian Cocktail using Kahlua and Vodka.

The White Russian was born around the year 1965, that is the year it first shows up in print. The White Russian is the sister cocktail of the Black Russian and is sometimes called a Caucasian Cocktail. This is a classic Kahlua cocktail that is very easy to make. The cocktail got its interesting name from the vodka, a Russian spirit, and the whiteness of the milk and or cream. By far on of the most popular kahlua cocktails.


White Russian Recipe
Ingredients:
• 1 Part Kahlua
• 1 Part Vodka (Grey Goose, Smirnoff, Absolut, Skyy, etc.)
• 1 Part Cream or Milk (Baileys Irish Cream and Ice cream is optional)
• ice cubes

Procedure:
Pour the Kahlua and Vodka over the ice in a short cocktail glass.
Fill to the top with cream or milk.


White Russian Cake

Creamy vanilla poured over rich, coffee-infused chocolate: the White Russian cocktail has always been in the realm of dessert. This tantalizing recipe from our magazine, Sift, makes it official by transforming cocktail into cake. Note: We have updated the frosting method (as of 3/27/17) to ensure the meringue powder is properly hydrated.

Ingredients

  • 6 tablespoons (85g) butter, softened
  • 1 1/3 cups (262g) sugar
  • 3 tablespoons (35g) vegetable oil
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 2 large egg whites, at room temperature
  • 1 large egg, at room temperature
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla extract
  • 2 cups (241g) King Arthur Unbleached All-Purpose Flour
  • 1 cup (227g) full-fat plain yogurt, at room temperature
  • 1 1/4 cups (149g) King Arthur Unbleached All-Purpose Flour
  • 3/4 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 cup + 2 tablespoons (32g) unsweetened cocoa, Dutch-process or natural
  • 1 teaspoon espresso powder
  • 3/4 cup (149g) sugar
  • 4 tablespoons (56g) butter, softened
  • 2 tablespoons (25g) vegetable oil
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/2 cup (113g) milk, at room temperature
  • 1/4 cup (57g) brewed coffee
  • 2 large eggs, at room temperature
  • 1/2 cup (99g) granulated sugar
  • 1/2 cup (113g) water
  • 1/4 cup (57g) Kahlua liqueur or other coffee liqueur
  • 2 teaspoons espresso powder
  • 1/3 cup (57g) chopped bittersweet chocolate
  • 6 tablespoons (85g) heavy cream
  • 2 tablespoons (28g) Kahlua, divided
  • 1 1/4 cups (248g) granulated sugar
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup (227g) water, divided
  • 1/2 cup (85g) meringue powder
  • 24 tablespoons (340g) unsalted butter, at room temperature, at least 65°F
  • 1/2 cup (92g) vegetable shortening or an additional 8 tablespoons (113g) unsalted butter, at room temperature, optional
  • 2 tablespoons (28g) water
  • 2 tablespoons (39g) light corn syrup
  • 2 tablespoons + 2 teaspoons (28g) chopped white chocolate
  • 1 1/4 cups (142g) confectioners' sugar, sifted
  • 1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • pinch of salt

Instructions

Preheat the oven to 350°F. Grease and flour three 8" round cake pans.

To make the vanilla batter: In a large mixing bowl, beat together the butter, sugar, vegetable oil, baking powder, and salt.

In a small bowl whisk together the egg whites, whole egg, and vanilla. With the mixer running at medium-low speed, slowly add the egg mixture to the butter/sugar mixture.

Add the flour alternately with the yogurt, beginning and ending with the flour. Scrape down the bowl and mix for another 30 seconds. Divide the batter evenly among the prepared pans.

For the chocolate batter: Whisk together the flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt, cocoa, espresso powder, and sugar. Add the butter and beat at medium speed until the mixture looks sandy. Mix in the vegetable oil and vanilla.

Combine the milk with the coffee and add gradually, with the mixer running at low speed. Increase the speed to medium-high and beat for 1 minute. Add the eggs, one at a time, beating well after each. Scrape the bowl, then beat for 30 seconds more.

Scoop the batter in a random pattern into each of the three pans until all is used. Using a table knife or spatula, swirl the chocolate batter through the vanilla very lightly, taking two or three turns through each pan.

Place the layers on the center rack of the oven and bake for 24 to 26 minutes, until they just begin to pull away from the side of the pan and the top springs back when lightly touched. Remove from the oven and cool completely on a rack, still in the pans.

To make the Kahlua soak: In a small saucepan set over medium heat, combine the sugar and water, stirring occasionally until the sugar dissolves. Remove from the heat, add the Kahlua, and cool to room temperature.

To make the frosting: In a small bowl, combine the espresso powder and chopped chocolate. Heat the cream to a simmer and pour over the ingredients in the bowl. Let sit for 2 minutes, then stir or whisk until smooth. Stir in 1 tablespoon of the Kahlua and set the mixture aside to cool while you make the buttercream.

Combine the sugar, salt, and half of the water in a medium saucepan and bring to a boil, stirring occasionally. Boil for 3 to 5 minutes without further stirring, until the syrup reaches 240°F, then pour the hot syrup into the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a whisk.

Add the remaining tablespoon of Kahlua, the remaining 1/2 cup of water, and sprinkle the meringue powder over the hot liquid. Whisk slowly until the powder dissolves.

Increase the mixer's speed to medium and beat until the mixture begins to get foamy, then turns white and increases in volume. Turn the mixer's speed to high, and beat for 3 to 4 minutes, until the mixture is thick and glossy-looking.

Add the butter a few tablespoons at a time, with the mixer running. The mixture will thin out and look a little curdled for awhile don't let that throw you. Keep the mixer going and add the rest of the butter. If you want more frosting or are planning to serve the cake in a warm environment, beat in the additional 1/2 cup shortening or butter. The frosting will transform itself into a smooth, silky, fluffy mass as you go.

Divide the frosting in half, and stir the cooled chocolate mixture into one of the halves.

Turn the cake layers out of their pans and place them right side up. If the layers have a dome on the top, use a long, serrated knife to trim them level. Brush the trimmed side with 2 to 3 tablespoons of the Kahlua soak, then flip one of the layers over, trimmed side down, onto a serving plate.

Brush the other side of the layer with more of the soak, and once it's absorbed, spread a 3/8"-thick layer of the chocolate frosting over it. Repeat the trimming and soaking process with the second layer, placing it over the first. Frost the top of that layer with a layer of the white frosting.

Trim, soak, and place the last layer on top of the cake. Use the white frosting to thinly coat the top and halfway down the side of the cake. It's OK if this looks messy this is called a crumb coat. Use the chocolate frosting to thinly coat the bottom layer. Refrigerate the cake for 30 minutes to allow the crumb coat to firm up.

After you can touch the crumb coat without leaving a fingerprint, use the rest of the frosting to put a finish layer on the top and sides of the cake. The White Russian cocktail is lighter on top and darker on the bottom, so repeat the white frosting on top and chocolate on the bottom, mixing them together a bit in the middle.

To make the icing: Put the water and corn syrup in a heatproof 2-cup measure, stirring to combine. Microwave on high for 60 seconds. Add the chocolate and stir until it melts. Gradually whisk in the confectioners' sugar, until the icing is completely smooth, creamy white, and lump-free. Stir in the vanilla and salt. If the icing starts to set, microwave it in 5-second pulses, stirring after each, until pourable. Drizzle over the chilled, frosted cake and let it run down the sides.

Store the cake in the refrigerator until 30 minutes before you wish to serve it. Place plastic wrap on any cut edges of leftover cake, and refrigerate for up to 1 week.


4. Triangle Russian (The Umstead Bar & Lounge Raleigh, N.C.)

Named so because the ingredients come from all three points of North Carolina’s Research Triangle (Raleigh, Durham and Chapel Hill), this cocktail is a creation of bartender James Duerr, who makes his version with TOPO organic vodka, Durham Distillery’s Damn Fine coffee liqueur, cinnamon-infused simple syrup and Larry’s Beans cold-brew coffee. It’s topped with whipped cream and a cinnamon sprinkle.


White Russian ingredients

Add the vodka and Kahlua to a glass filled with ice, then add a generous splash of cream and give it a stir. The ratios are often 1 part vodka, 1 part Kahlua and 1 part cream, but when I am making White Russians at home, I change it up a bit.

The first change I make is swapping the cream for half-and-half or whole milk. Although heavy cream is delicious, I find that half-and-half or whole milk still adds plenty of richness without making it too heavy.

I usually follow a ratio of 1 part vodka, 2 parts Kahlua and 3 parts half-and-half. This creates a nice creamy cocktail that has plenty of coffee flavor without too much of a punch from the vodka.

Now, if you wanted to ( hint: you do ) you could skip adding the ice to your White Russian recipe and instead plop a big fat scoop of vanilla ICE CREAM into it. Guys, please try this at least once. It’s like a spiked coffee milkshake (without dirtying a blender), and it is so dang delicious! Note: instead of using vanilla ice cream, you could also use coffee, chocolate or caramel ice cream. Swoon.

My recipe makes a single serving. You can easily increase the portions to make multiple cocktails or even a whole pitcher. Use the ratio 1 part vodka, 2 parts Kahlua, 3 parts whole milk/half and half/cream to make the quantities needed. And of course, adjust to suit your taste. That’s the beauty of making cocktails at home, you can get them just the way you want them every time.

I’ll leave you with one last little warning: These White Russians are dangerous. They are smooth and tasty and they go down easily. Too easily. Don’t say I didn’t warn ya! Enjoy!

Try some of my other favorite happy hour cocktails!

Tools used to make this White Russian recipe

Jigger: Every home bartender should have a jigger for measuring their cocktail ingredients. This one has a no-slip grip and is marked with increment measuring lines so you can make the perfect cocktail every time.

Rocks Glass: I’m a cocktail enthusiast and a great cocktail should be served in a quality glass. These rocks glasses have a great weight to them and the classic design will never go out of style.


How to Make a White Russian

You'll need vodka, Kahlua, and a couple other ingredients.

The Wondrich Take:

What is now in the center was once at the margin. In the history of ideas, the inquiring mind will identify a constant do-si-do between "no way" and "of course" between stuff that nobody thinks and stuff that everybody thinks. One day the idea of a single god who created everything and sacrificed his own begotten son to rescue humankind from eternal damnation will get you turned into lion chow. Then, bam! Paradigm shift, and you get burned alive if you're not on the monotheism tip. Or take that guy Galileo. You get the idea. No matter which field of human knowledge you examine, which art or science, you find the same dynamic. The art of mixing drinks (or is it the science of mixology?) is no different. Case in point, the White Russian.

Roll the clock back to 1930 or so, and, if you look hard enough, you might just turn up a couple of little gloom-lifters based on vodka, then a little-known novelty spirit from the land of Rasputin and tractor-building collectives. There's the Russian, which mixes the stuff in equal proportion with gin and crème de cacao. If you don't like that (and, truth be told, there's not much reason why you should), you can have a Barbara: two parts vodka, one part crème de cacao, one part cream. Of course, that one's even more marginal. Back then, cream was rarely found in drinks outside the uber-girly precincts of the Pousse Café (the multilayered liqueur anthology it is, alas, still with us).

Over the next 30 years, a lot of things happened that we really don't want to get into, and a few that we do, among them the Russian losing its gin (a lot of that going around) and trading in its dowdy old crème de cacao for the trendy new Kahlúa. And the Barbara getting renamed the Russian Bear (the fact that somebody felt that this deeply frilly drink needed toughening up namewise speaks volumes about the evolution of postwar American drinking), and then losing the "Bear" and doing the Kahlúa shuffle as well. By the end of the '50s, in other words, there are two vodka-Kahlúa Russians out there, with and without cream. This final stage is documented in the 1961 Diners' Club Drink Book, which pins a "Black" on the no-cream one, implying that there's a white one out there from which it must be distinguished.

At any rate, this period of careful evolution was time well spent. By the end of the next decade, the White Russian assumed its present place: straddling the world of mixed drinking like the Colossus of Rhodes, one foot planted firmly among the folks who never drink, the other among those who always do. Lightweights and lushes. Now, this isn't as weird a constituency as it might appear. Like its cousin the Brandy Alexander, the White Russian so effectively lubricates the hefty dose of alcohol it contains that it goes down the hatch with no resistance whatsoever. That's good if you're not used to the stuff -- or too used to it (see The Big Lebowski, in which they provide the bulk of the Dude's daily nutrition). And besides, gargle down a martini every 20 minutes, and you might as well be sporting a scarlet "D" (for "Drunk"). But these sweet, creamy deceivers look so innocuous, it's hard to take them seriously. That's called denial.

  1. Shake well with cracked ice, then strain into a chilled Old-Fashioned glass (it'll look less wicked than in a martini glass that's important).
  2. Some folks build this one on the rocks, floating the cream on top. No.

The Wondrich Take:

What is now in the center was once at the margin. In the history of ideas, the inquiring mind will identify a constant do-si-do between "no way" and "of course" between stuff that nobody thinks and stuff that everybody thinks. One day the idea of a single god who created everything and sacrificed his own begotten son to rescue humankind from eternal damnation will get you turned into lion chow. Then, bam! Paradigm shift, and you get burned alive if you're not on the monotheism tip. Or take that guy Galileo. You get the idea. No matter which field of human knowledge you examine, which art or science, you find the same dynamic. The art of mixing drinks (or is it the science of mixology?) is no different. Case in point, the White Russian.

Roll the clock back to 1930 or so, and, if you look hard enough, you might just turn up a couple of little gloom-lifters based on vodka, then a little-known novelty spirit from the land of Rasputin and tractor-building collectives. There's the Russian, which mixes the stuff in equal proportion with gin and crème de cacao. If you don't like that (and, truth be told, there's not much reason why you should), you can have a Barbara: two parts vodka, one part crème de cacao, one part cream. Of course, that one's even more marginal. Back then, cream was rarely found in drinks outside the uber-girly precincts of the Pousse Café (the multilayered liqueur anthology it is, alas, still with us).

Over the next 30 years, a lot of things happened that we really don't want to get into, and a few that we do, among them the Russian losing its gin (a lot of that going around) and trading in its dowdy old crème de cacao for the trendy new Kahlúa. And the Barbara getting renamed the Russian Bear (the fact that somebody felt that this deeply frilly drink needed toughening up namewise speaks volumes about the evolution of postwar American drinking), and then losing the "Bear" and doing the Kahlúa shuffle as well. By the end of the '50s, in other words, there are two vodka-Kahlúa Russians out there, with and without cream. This final stage is documented in the 1961 Diners' Club Drink Book, which pins a "Black" on the no-cream one, implying that there's a white one out there from which it must be distinguished.

At any rate, this period of careful evolution was time well spent. By the end of the next decade, the White Russian assumed its present place: straddling the world of mixed drinking like the Colossus of Rhodes, one foot planted firmly among the folks who never drink, the other among those who always do. Lightweights and lushes. Now, this isn't as weird a constituency as it might appear. Like its cousin the Brandy Alexander, the White Russian so effectively lubricates the hefty dose of alcohol it contains that it goes down the hatch with no resistance whatsoever. That's good if you're not used to the stuff -- or too used to it (see The Big Lebowski, in which they provide the bulk of the Dude's daily nutrition). And besides, gargle down a martini every 20 minutes, and you might as well be sporting a scarlet "D" (for "Drunk"). But these sweet, creamy deceivers look so innocuous, it's hard to take them seriously. That's called denial.


Steps to Make It

Pour the coffee liqueur into an old-fashioned glass filled with ice cubes.

Add the rye whiskey and milk.

How Strong Is the Sneaky Pete?

Let's assume that you use a coffee liqueur that is 20 percent ABV and an 80-proof whiskey to mix up your sneaky Pete. In this case, you can estimate the drink to have an alcohol content of around 9 percent ABV (18 proof). It is a very gentle whiskey drink and a nice, casual sipper.

Sneaky Pete

The term "sneaky Pete" was often slang for cheap booze or fortified wine. But it also may be applied to good-tasting drinks that sneak up on you when you don't realize the amount of alcohol you are imbibing.

In addition to this recipe made with coffee liqueur, whiskey, and milk, you will see versions that are fruit-juice-based drinks with other forms of alcohol. Some are even frozen slushy drinks. If you plan to order a sneaky Pete at a bar, you should specify exactly what you expect. You may also end up in a debate with your guests over whether this cocktail is what they were envisioning for a sneaky Pete.

What Is Rye Whiskey?

Rye whiskey from the U.S. is made with a mash of at least 51 percent rye. George Washington made rye whiskey on his Mount Vernon estate, and today a craft distillery produces it there. Rye whiskey has a spicier or fruitier flavor than bourbon, which is also sweeter than rye. Canadian rye whisky is also available but doesn't have a set percentage of rye required. As a result, Canadian ryes may have far more corn and very little rye.

What Is Coffee Liqueur?

The most popular brands of coffee liqueurs are made with rum, sugar, vanilla, and coffee. It is very easy to make your own coffee liqueur with cold-brewed coffee, sugar, and a vanilla bean. You can make it with rum or with vodka. It's best to let it age for two weeks before enjoying it.


The twist: Swap out the cream for coconut milk.

Perfect for: Sipping in your studio apartment while dreaming about the exotic beach vacation that's not in your budget right now, or serving with takeout Pad Thai on your next at-home date night.


Watch the video: Διάσημη Ρωσική Τούρτα Μεντοβίκ-Σπαρτάκ (May 2022).


Comments:

  1. Matsushita

    You write well! Continue in the same spirit

  2. Maur

    An interesting topic, I will take part. Together we can come to the right answer. I'm sure.

  3. Minos

    especially about the vulgar crumb

  4. Cawley

    Bravo, your thought is great



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